January 2018 New Releases

Jan Adult PicksNew year, new books. Here are 10 books I’m excited about that will be released in January.

1Blue Planet II: A New World of Hidden Depths by James Honeyborne (out January 1st)
Our understanding of ocean life has changed dramatically in the last decade, with new species, new behaviours, and new habitats being discovered at a rapid rate. Blue Planet II, which accompanies an epic 7-part series on BBC1, is a ground-breaking new look at the richness and variety of underwater life across our planet. With over 200 breath-taking photographs and stills from the BBC Natural History Unit’s spectacular footage, each chapter of Blue Planet II brings to life a different habitat of the oceanic world.

2Frankenstein: How a Monster Became an Icon: The Science and Enduring Allure of Mary Shelley’s Creation by Eddy von Mueller & Sidney Perkowitz (out January 2nd)
Few creations have risen from literary origins to reach world-wide importance like Frankenstein. This landmark volume celebrates the bicentenary of Mary Shelley’s creation and its indelible impact on art and culture. Physicist Sidney Perkowitz and film expert Eddy von Muller have brought together scholars and scientists, artists and directors—including Mel Brooks—to celebrate and examine Mary Shelley’s marvelous creation and its legacy as the monster moves into his next century.

3Achtung Baby: An American Mom on the German Art of Raising Self Reliant Children by Sara Zaske (out January 2nd)
When Sara Zaske moved from Oregon to Berlin with her husband and toddler, she knew the transition would be challenging, especially when she became pregnant with her second child. She was surprised to discover that German parents give their children a great deal of freedom—much more than Americans. Through her own family’s often funny experiences as well as interviews with other parents, teachers, and experts, Zaske shares the many unexpected parenting lessons she learned from living in Germany, and how American parents can give their own children the freedom they need to grow into responsible, independent adults.

4The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin (out January 9th)
It’s 1969 in New York City’s Lower East Side, and word has spread of the arrival of a mystical woman, a traveling psychic who claims to be able to tell anyone the day they will die. The Gold children—four adolescents on the cusp of self-awareness—sneak out to hear their fortunes, and what they’re told informs the next 50 years of their lives.

5Treating People Well: The Extraordinary Power of Civility at Work and in Life by Lea Berman and Jeremy Bernard (out January 9th)
A guide to personal and professional empowerment through civility and social skills, written by two White House Social Secretaries who offer an important fundamental message—everyone is important and everyone deserves to be treated well.

6Tell Me More: Stories About the 12 Hardest Things I’m Learning to Say by Kelly Corrigan (out January 9th)
Tell Me More is a funny, wise and insightful exploration of seven sentences adult life requires. With Kelly’s signature candor and good will, each chapter draws from her sometimes ridiculous, sometimes profound struggles with parenting and marriage, career and friendship, illness, aging and mortality. Each chapter is animated by poignant, hilarious stories from Kelly’s own life and is focused on one of seven sentences: “Onward,” “I Don’t Know,” “Tell Me More,” “No,” “You Got This,” “I Was Wrong,” and “You Can Go.”

7This Could Hurt by Jillian Medoff (out January 9th)
A razor-sharp and deeply felt novel that illuminates the pivotal role of work in our lives and that captures the emotional complexities of five HR colleagues trying to balance ambition, hope, and fear as their small company is buffeted by economic forces that threaten to upend them.

8When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir by Patrisse Khan-Cullors & asha bandele (out January 16th)
From one of the co-founders of the Black Lives Matter movement comes a poetic memoir and reflection on humanity. Necessary and timely, Patrisse Cullors’ story asks us to remember that protest in the interest of the most vulnerable comes from love. Leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement have been called terrorists, a threat to America. But in truth, they are loving women whose life experiences have led them to seek justice for those victimized by the powerful. In this meaningful, empowering account of survival, strength, and resilience, Patrisse Cullors and asha bandele seek to change the culture that declares innocent black life expendable.

9It Occurs to Me that I Am America: New Stories and Art edited by Jonathan Santlofer (out January 16th)
When Donald Trump claimed victory last November, the US literary world erupted in indignation. Many of America’s leading writers and artists openly resist the current administration’s dogma and earliest policy moves, and they’re not about to go gently into that good night. Featuring artwork by some of today’s best known artists, cartoonists, and graphic novelists—including Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Marilyn Minter, and Eric Fischl—who cover political, social, and cultural issues, this anthology is a beautiful, enduring collection that will resonate with anyone concerned with the contest for our American soul.

10Jefferson’s Daughters: Three Sisters, White and Black, In a Young America by Catherine Kerrison (out January 30th)
Thomas Jefferson had three daughters: Martha and Maria by his wife, Martha Wayles Jefferson, and Harriet by his slave Sally Hemings. Catherine Kerrison, a scholar of early American and women’s history, recounts the remarkable journey of these three women—and how their struggle to define themselves reflects both the possibilities and the limitations that resulted from the American Revolution.